Is it the human resource policy to blame?.

Examining intention to quit among woman managers in Arab Middle Eastern content.

by October 4, 2016 Published in UAE

Examining intention to quit among woman managers in Arab Middle Eastern content

Is it the human resource policy to blame? Examining intention to quit among women managers in Arab Middle Eastern context

The paper examines the circumstances that surround women managers in the public and private sectors in UAE and how these women leaders end up leaving their jobs by resigning, changing organizations, or just quit (turnover).

Place: Center for Public Policy and Leadership, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, UAE

Date: October 4, 2016

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Introduction #section1

The paper examines the circumstances that surround women managers in the public and private sectors in UAE and how these women leaders end up leaving their jobs by resigning, changing organizations, or just quit (turnover). The study finds that turnover among women managers is multidimensional and therefore eight different factors influence it, from which HR policy is just one factor. these factors are: economic needs, quality of work life, leadership style of the superiors, social needs, marital status, organizational satisfaction, organizational commitment, and HR public policy.

The paper highlights the reality that even in a rich country like UAE, employees (i.e. women managers) are still motivated by a combination of economic, social, and psychological means. The paper also points to the importance of workplace environment, which apparently affects leaders and followers. This paper adds evidence that Emiratization, as a major HR public policy, should not be blamed for the relatively high level of turnover among local women managers.

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